President & CEO Arva Rice Testifies at Common Core Task Force in Queens

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 9, 2015
Contact: Alain Robert
arobert@nyul.org
212-926-8000 ext 145

 

NEW YORK URBAN LEAGUE PRESIDENT & CEO ARVA RICE TESTIFIES AT COMMON CORE TASK FORCE IN QUEENS:

 

 

New York, New York – New York Urban League President and CEO Arva Rice testified at Governor Cuomo’s first ever Common Core Task Force. This task force was created to review the implementation of the common core standards in New York. Speakers including Arva Rice and about a hundred people filled the LaGuardia Community College conference room.

 

 

Ms. Rice’s testimony highlighted the state’s failure to address achievement gaps in minority communities and how new standards were a step forward to addressing the problem. Arva Rice also touched on how data and high standards were used during the civil rights movement to measure the inequality faced by millions of students throughout the country. Ms. Rice finished her testimony by challenging the community to “opt-in” and not return to the education system that was not addressing the lack of academic and economic opportunity-faced by many low income minority families.

 

 

When asked by Assemblywoman Catherine Nolan about her thoughts on assessments Arva Rice responded, “Assessments happen in everyday life no matter what profession you are in. Although I may question the number of test students are given each year. Assessments provide a meaningful way to judge whether the system created is putting all students on the path to college and career readiness.”
President and CEO, Arva Rice was not alone in her support of high standards at this hearing. Stephen Sigmund of High Achievement New York, Evan Stone of Educators for Excellence, and about 50 parents from StudentsFirst were also in attendance giving the pro-common core audience a solid majority at the hearing.

 

 

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About the New York Urban League
The New York Urban League was founded by a group of prominent New Yorkers concerned with the poor state of blacks migrating to New York City from the south. From its inception it provided employment and connections for migrating blacks bridging the adjustment from the agricultural/rural life to the industrial urban center. Each decade following, “The League” provided critical services such as emergency aid for the unemployed during the Great Depression; formed the Committee for Interracial Voluntary Hospitals to provide care and work in local hospitals; negotiated the opening of employment for blacks in the airline, brewing, and baking industries; created “Street Academies” which became a national model for high school students; published the first State of Black New York report; and created its signature events including Frederick Douglas Dinner, Whitney M. Young Jr. Classic, and Champion of Diversity Breakfast among many other milestones. Visit www.nyul.org for additional information.

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